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Good Night, Forest

 
Cover: Good Night, Forest
 
 

Even the forest has to sleep! This sweet walk through the forest says good night to flora and fauna alike, from the quiet bunny to the howling coyote. With silly, colorful illustrations and soft rhyme that is sure to lull littles ones off to sleep, this will be a favorite bedtime pick.

Details

Specifications

  • Dewey: [E]
  • Graphics: Full-color illustrations
  • Hardcover (9781585363889): 32 pages, 9 (w) x 11 (h), © 2018, 04/15/2018
  • PDF (9781534123014): 32 pages, 9 (w) x 11 (h), © 2018, 04/15/2018
  • Hosted ebook (9781534123182): 32 pages, 9 (w) x 11 (h), © 2018, 04/15/2018
  • Subject: Language Arts

Leveling

  • Suggested Interest Level: Age 0-4 - Age 7
  • Suggested Reading Level: Grade 1
  • Lexile® Measure: 280
  • Guided Reading Level: I
  • Accelerated Reader® Quiz: Pending

BISAC Subjects

Reviews

Booklist - Good Night, Forest

Despite the title, a cheerful rhyming text opens with morning in the forest, as couplets introduce flora, fauna, and other natural elements: “Good morning, bird. / Sing your song. / Good morning, stream. / Hum along.” Bucci’s multimedia illustrations, composed of dense brushstrokes of thick color to shape cartoonish forest creatures, portray each scene in a gentle, humorous manner and highlight specific parts of the animals. The porcupine, for example, with spiky quills and huge, wide eyes, is described as looking “lively,” while the turtle is invited to come out of its shell. As the sun goes down, the color palette changes and the text shifts to describing the forest dwellers going to sleep. More animals are added to the group as they all wind down for the night. The final image features a human adult and child, reading at night in a tent, making this book an appropriate accompaniment to an outdoor evening or a regular nighttime routine. Though there’s not much new here, animal-loving little ones might warm to this forest-themed bedtime read.

Kirkus Reviews – Good Night, Forest

Another riff on Goodnight Moon, this one is set in a forest. The opening rhyme sets the scene. “Good morning, forest. / Rise and shine! / Good morning, maple, / Oak and pine.” The text welcomes, in turn, an assemblage of forest flora, fauna, and landscape elements to a new day: deer, bird, stream, flowers, cricket, porcupine, ferns, turtle, and skunk. The creatures play until the end of day, when a hush falls over the forest and it’s time to sleep. The illustrations are eye-catching, with darkly saturated colors applied in painterly strokes that extend off of the page. The images appear as if shellacked or polished on the glossy paper, and they gently exaggerate the features of the animals; all have wide, pop eyes (even the cricket), and the porcupine’s quills and beaver’s buck teeth are humorously hyperbolic. The ending, which features an adult and child inside a lit tent reading a book, is a nice touch. “Time to sleep! / All creatures do. / Good night, forest. / Good night, you.” However, although all the ingredients work well enough together, there is little about the book that helps it to rise above the rest and should be considered only in situations where there is an ache for another bedtime book. Good for sharing one on one, this is a pleasant bedtime story for those who don’t already have enough. (Picture book. 4-7)

Contributors

Author: Denise Brennan-Nelson

Denise Brennan-Nelson has written a number of books for children, including Tallulah: Mermaid of the Great Lakes, Leopold the Lion, Someday Is Not a Day of the Week, My Momma Likes to Say, and the popular Willow series. As a national speaker, Denise encourages adults and children to tap into their imaginations to create richer, fuller lives. She travels the country, sharing her reading and writing enthusiasm with schoolchildren and teachers. Denise lives in Howell, Michigan with her husband, Bob. She strives to spend each day teaching and learning with a creative spirit. Find out more about Denise at www.denisebrennannelson.com.

Illustrator: Marco Bucci

Marco Bucci recognized two things at a young age. The first was that he wanted to become a professional artist. The second was that he couldn't draw. This delayed him for quite some time. He filled that time pursuing other artistic interests such as music and writing. But the urge to draw never left him. At age nineteen he began to study classical drawing, which led him to kindle a love for painting and illustration. He hasn't looked back since. Marco lives with his family in Germany.