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Invisible Lizard

 
Cover: Invisible Lizard
 
 

Poor Napoleon. Despite being the spiffiest chameleon in the jungle, he has no friends. And why is that? Because no one can see him! As everyone knows, chameleons blend in with their surroundings. Napoleon is practically invisible. So he tries every trick he can think of, from waving his arms to weaving a welcome mat to making funny faces, to get the other jungle animals to see him. But it's his final trick that really gets him noticed.

Details

Specifications

  • Graphics: Full-color illustrations
  • Hardcover (9781585363780): 32 pages, 9 (w) x 11 (h), © 2017, 08/15/2017
  • PDF (9781534103061): 32 pages, 9 (w) x 11 (h), © 2017, 08/15/2017
  • Hosted ebook (9781534103214): 32 pages, 9 (w) x 11 (h), © 2017, 08/15/2017
  • Subject: Language Arts

Leveling

  • Suggested Interest Level: Age 5 - Age 7
  • Suggested Reading Level: Grade 1
  • Lexile® Measure: 470
  • Guided Reading Level: L
  • Accelerated Reader® Quiz: Pending

BISAC Subjects

Reviews

School Library Jouranl - Invisible Lizard

Napoleon is a vibrant chameleon. Unfortunately, all of his colors blend perfectly with the background of his home in the rain forest, making it nearly impossible for anyone to see him. How is a guy supposed to make new friends if he’s practically invisible? Napoleon tries everything to get noticed: waving his arms, making funny faces, even standing on his head. Alas, no one sees him until he falls off his tree branch and dangles by his tongue. All of a sudden, everyone is aware of him. Readers will root for Napoleon and enjoy poring over the bright, full-bleed illustrations of the tropical rain forest and its inhabitants. VERDICT This amusing, heartwarming tale will ¬appeal to a wide audience and would also make a great read-aloud addition to a friendship- or rain forest–themed storytime. Highly recommended.

Kirkus Reviews - Invisible Lizard

Napoleon, a colorful, “spiffy” chameleon, lives on an equally “spiffy” tree limb and blends in so well with his surroundings the other jungle residents cannot see him.With his charming personality, Napoleon tries to entice and engage Polly, a squawking parrot, and Mike, a screeching monkey, by waving his arms, weaving a welcome mat, and making funny faces. Much to their fright and distress, the parrot and monkey see only a talking tree. In his final attempt to be recognized, Napoleon stands on his head and eventually slips and falls, so he’s forced to use his sticky tongue to flick and grab hold of the limb. Suddenly everyone is able to see him hanging by his tongue. Polly is impressed by his colors, and Mike admires his swinging. The three become friends through daily visits and games of hide-and-seek. Detailed, vibrant paintings in boldly verdant colors give Napoleon’s rain-forest environment a surrealistic twist. Curved shapes echo the lizard’s bulging eyes, rounded body, bumpy skin, and curling tail, melding kaleidoscopically with his ever changing colors. The well-designed layout draws children into the paintings to search for Polly, Mike, and, of course, Napoleon in each amid abundant insects, mushrooms, ferns, and fungus living and growing on the tree limb. An attractive complement to Eric Carle’s The Mixed-Up Chameleon.

Contributors

Author: Kurt Cyrus

Illustrator: Andy Atkins