The Boy and the Moon

 
You must login to add items to your wishlist
Cover: The Boy and the Moon
 
 

It's midnight - a special time of night, when anything can happen. Wide awake long past his bedtime, a young boy slips outside his house to join some special friends in a nighttime jubilation. Complete with howls and whoops, they joyously celebrate the mystery and magic of the night, basking in the glow of the moonlight. They howled at the moon, they howled at life, and they howled with all things in the night. But their revelry comes to a halt when the moon is caught in the branches of a tree. Is anyone brave enough to climb the tree and save the moon? Gorgeous atmospheric paintings lure readers of all ages into believing that anything can happen - at midnight! J. (Jim) Carroll's work has been displayed around the world, including at the Leonardo da Vinci Museum of Science & Technology in Milan and at the United Nations in NYC. He has been an instructor at the School of Visual Arts and at the Massachusetts Museum of Modern Art. His work has also been featured in Zoom, HOW, PRINT and Communication Arts magazines. The Boy and the Moon is his first children's book.

Details

Specifications

  • Dewey: E
  • Graphics: Full-color illustrations
  • Hardcover (9781585365210): 32 pages, 9 (w) x 11 (h), © 2010, 09/09/2010
  • PDF (9781410307620): 32 pages, 9 (w) x 11 (h), © 2011, 12/10/2011
  • Hosted ebook (9781627534611): 32 pages, © 2014, 08/15/2013

Leveling

  • Suggested Interest Level: Age 6 - Age 9
  • ATOS Reading Level: 2.6
  • ATOS Interest Level: LG
  • Accelerated Reader® Quiz: 139321
  • Accelerated Reader® Points: 0.5

BISAC Subjects

Reviews

Review of The Boy and the Moon

At midnight, a boy steps outside to howl and dance with animals under a swirling periwinkle sky in debut author/illustrator Carroll’s story of moonlight revelry and a boy’s ingenuity. When the moon gets stuck in a tree, the boy bravely ascends, feeding it apples and allowing the now “full” moon to roll out of the tree. There’s an overall eerie feel to Carroll’s artwork that won’t appeal to all tastes—the degree to which the moon and a flower are personified feels especially strange next to the actual boy—but the story has an undeniable pull, as “They howled at the moon, they howled at life, and they howled with all the things in the night.” Ages 4 6.

Review of The Boy and the Moon

Carroll’s first picture-book effort uses a dreamy, softened palette and swirly, curved movement to convey the silvery magic of a moonlit evening. Collage effects—in the craggy surface of the moon and the siding of a house, for instance—lend dimensional texture. The overall mood is one of whimsy and wonder as a small boy in star-embellished pajamas, accompanied by a bevy of small companions (dog, owl, flower, rabbit, toad, and chicken), sashays outside for a nighttime romp. When the moon gets itself caught in the branches of an apple tree, no one but the boy is brave enough, or tree-climbing-capable enough, to help out. Still, he is unable to budge the moon. But then the child has an ingenious idea, “a delicious thought, a bright, ripe, red thought.” He feeds the moon the tree’s fruit until the moon grows big, fat and round, and can be rolled free. The satisfying sense of accomplishment portrayed will give small readers a subtle feeling of confidence. A unique addition to bedtime collections. Preschool-Kindergarten.

Review of The Boy and the Moon

Moonlit midnight revels nearly end in disaster until a small boy comes to the rescue. It’s midnight, and a boy with a teddy bear, a dog, a rabbit, an owl, a chicken, a toad and a flower gather in the backyard to dance and howl at the moon in joyous abandon. Somehow the moon gets stuck in an apple tree, which brings the dancing and howling to a halt. Who can help the moon? Owl’s afraid of heights, rabbit doesn’t feel lucky, toad hides, the flower faints, chicken has a bellyache and dog can’t climb trees. The boy, however, bravely scales the tree, but he can’t dislodge the moon from its branches—until he uses what’s available to save the night. Carroll’s magical illustrations transform his simple plot into a luminous moonlight fantasy. Crafted from paint, found objects and natural textures, his collages in midnight blues and silvery whites bathe the cavorting revelers in ethereal moonlight. Close-ups of the anthropomorphized moon interacting with the pajama-clad boy add to the overall aura of magical realism. Marvelous nighttime madness. (Picture book. 4-6)

Contributors

Author, Illustrator: James Christopher Carroll

J. (Jim) Carroll’s work has been displayed around the world, including at the Leonardo da Vinci Museum of Science & Technology in Milan andat the United Nations in NYC. He has been an instructor at the School of Visual Arts and at the Massachusetts Museum of Modern Art. His work has also been featured in Zoom, HOW, PRINT and Communication Arts magazines. The Boy and the Moon is his first children’s book.